At the G20 summit last week, Moon Jae-in discussed the need for talks with North Korea to establish permanent peace on the Korean Peninsula while also making pointed remarks about the North’s test of Hwasong-14, an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), on July 4.

After calling for a peace process in Korea, Moon stood with the leaders of Japan and the U.S. in a show of commitment to “maximum pressure.” The three presidents released a statement of commitment to press “for the early adoption of a new UN security council resolution with additional sanctions…” against North Korea.

ZoominKorea’s Hyun Lee joined Thom Hartmann’s The Big Picture last week to discuss North Korea’s ICBM test and South Korea’s contradictory response:

I think that so far, Moon Jae-in’s policy pronouncements have been very confusing… he came to Washington last week to sign a joint statement with Trump that is all about strengthening the U.S.-ROK alliance. Now, he’s in Europe saying South Korea will negotiate a peace treaty with North Korea. These two things don’t make sense… strengthening the U.S.-ROK alliance is actually a very hostile policy towards North Korea.

Lee added:

So Moon Jae-in has to decide, is he going to strengthen the U.S.-ROK alliance or move towards reconciliation peacefully with North Korea? I don’t think you could have both things at once, which is what he is talking about… as long as that policy stands, I don’t think he will get very far.

(Video Source: The Big Picture RT)

Christine Hong of the Korea Policy Institute expressed cautious optimism regarding Moon Jae-in’s policy on North Korea. While “there has been a popular mandate for Moon Jae-in to actually shift South Korea’s policy towards North Korea,” according to Hong, it is not yet clear whether Moon will take up that mantle and follow in the footsteps of his liberal predecessors Kim Dae-jung and Roh Moo-hyun to pursue peaceful dialogue and engagement with North Korea.

Hong spoke with KJ Noh on Dennis Bernstein’s Flashpoints:

And I think that what we have seen from Moon Jae-in already has been somewhat disappointing, which is that he has made concessions to the United States… South Korea has supported four to five sanctions against North Korea.

Click here to listen to the full interview (interview begins at 19:00).

July 27, 2017 will mark 64 years since North Korea and the U.S. signed an armistice agreement. Yet the U.S. media consistently fails to discuss the current nuclear standoff as part of a long history of a war that never ended between the U.S. and North Korea.

Flashpoints’ special correspondent, KJ Noh, discussed the historical background of the armistice agreement–what it was supposed to yield after the Korean War was halted in 1953, and how the U.S. undermined the agreement:

There [were] some key provisions, among them was that all foreign troops would leave the Korean Peninsula, no new weapons would be introduced, and that negotiations for lasting peace would be pursued within 90 days. The very following day, it’s reported that the U.S. decided that they were just going to let this 90-day period expire and eventually… the placement of 950 nuclear warheads on the Korean Peninsula targeted against North Korea.

Christine Hong also discussed North Korea’s nuclear program within the context of an unended war in Korea on the Thom Hartmann Program.

(Video Source: Thom Hartmann Program)

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