Part 1: “It was the only thing left standing”: The Human Cost of War

As the United States threatened a preemptive strike and escalated military provocations against North Korea in recent weeks, the western media barraged the U.S. public ad nauseum with images of flying North Korean missiles and goose-stepping soldiers. Rarely mentioned in the western media is the human cost of war and what is at stake for Koreans in the north, south and overseas. 

ZoominKorea spoke with a panel of Korea experts–Christine Ahn, Ramsay Liem and Gregory Elich–about the human cost of war and division and what Korean Americans and progressive allies should be doing in this moment to call for peace. Listen to the audio segment below or click here.

Christine Ahn is the Executive Director of Women Cross DMZ, a global movement of women mobilizing to end the Korean War.

Ramsay Liem is professor emeritus of psychology at Boston College. He has conducted oral histories with Korean American survivors of the Korean War and produced the award-winning film, Memory of Forgotten War.

Gregory Elich is a member of the Solidarity Committee for Democracy and Peace in Korea and the author of Strange Liberators: Militarism, Mayhem, and the Pursuit of Profit.

Stay tuned for Part 2: A History Lesson on the US-N Korea Nuclear Crisis.

 

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